Life after Uni: Become a rep

It’s not all doom and gloom once you’re done with uni. Since you won’t have to actually be in the U.K. to attend lectures and hand in essays, take this opportunity to skedaddle to the snow for the whole season! 

Rather than just being able to go for a week or two a year, spending an entire season in the mountains should satisfy your snow appetite. There’s plenty of jobs on offer, and becoming a ski rep is ideal if you’ve got a working knowledge of the local language (just finished a French degree anyone?), a thick skin and a passion for relentless riding. 

Intrigued? We’ve laid out the pros - and cons - of working as a resort rep.  

Expect ridiculous amounts of riding time

Since the core hours are breakfast (7am - 9am) and evenings (5pm - 9pm), this leaves a lot of time to get out shredding during the day. Admittedly you’ll be on call if something goes wrong, but just be sure to check your phone on each chairlift. It certainly beats being trapped inside on a powder day watching fat flakes float down. 

Nattering with clients on sun-soaked slopes. All part and parcel of being a rep. Photo: www.htstotalski.com

Nattering with clients on sun-soaked slopes. All part and parcel of being a rep. Photo: www.htstotalski.com

Improve your language skills

 You’ll need to be fairly decent in the local language in order to communicate with suppliers, locals and assist in emergencies. Acting as the intermediary between locals and guests, if there’s a problem - for example, if a guest falls and needs to visit the resort doctor, you’ll be the main translator. The role offers a great chance to improve upon basic language skills. Even better, why not use that language degree you just obtained. It’s the perfect excuse to explain to querying grandparents that you’re off to 'use your degree' when they’re pondering why you aren’t applying for a 'norma' job. 

Expect all the trimmings to be included

You’ll have accommodation, lift pass, hire gear and some food as part of the package. Hence (unless you’re a big drinker) you can even save a little during the season. 

You’ll be Queen or King of après activities

As the main organiser/seller of post-ski events, the reps are in the know for all the fun stuff such as paret-ing (hurtling down the slopes on wooden sledges) or night torch descents. Plus, in order to sell tickets to the guests, you’ll probably get to join for free. Time to unleash that hidden tobogganist within. 

But on the plus side, you’ll have a ton of riding time. Photo: The Luxury Vacation Guide. 

But on the plus side, you’ll have a ton of riding time. Photo: The Luxury Vacation Guide. 

Yet, there are always a few downsides...

First up, you’ll be on call 24/7

If you feel a vibration in your pocket or hear that tinny nokia ringtone, it’ll probably be a grumpy guest wanting to vent their frustrations.

This leads to the most unpleasant side of the job: complaints

You’ll sadly be the punching bag for the company problems. Angry, irate customers can be a horrible side effect to being a rep, so prepare to take the blame. Added to this, if you’re not a big talker, it’s probably not the role for you. You’ll be gassing away to guests all day long and answering seemingly inane enquiries. 

And finally, the dreaded transfer day

It’s advisable not to have a hangover, as you’ll need to be overly chatty, bright and bubbly to greet guests as they arrive. Since you’ll be going to (and from) the airport, prepare for that arduously curvy journey down the mountain every weekend. This is distinctly unpleasant if you're still feeling queasy after the previous night’s drinking antics.  

Best not to have a hangover when riding these each weekend. Photo: Falls Creek. 

Best not to have a hangover when riding these each weekend. Photo: Falls Creek. 

A resort rep is an ideal role if you’ve got a hard shell and a bubbly character to deal with gobby guests and spicy situations. For avid riders looking to extend that week-long annual uni ski trip into a season long venture, this could be the job for you. 

All that’s left to do is hunt down that discarded book of French grammar and polish up your Italian hand gestures...